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              A Travel Guide about Niue Island in the South Pacific

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Visas and Customs to Niue

To Enter Niue all you need is a valid passport and an outbound ticket. A Visitor permit will be carefully stamped in your passport giving you the right to stay for up to 30 days. If you wish to stay longer than that, you should ask for a special permit prior to your arrival. If you arrive ina boat you should present papers and sign the book at customs in Alofi. 

One interesting thing in Niue is that the same people that stamp your passport, will see you many times on the Island for the simple fact they also double as Police. So, when you pass by to take your Niue Driver's license that sensation of " Have I meet you before ?" and "I saw you at the Immigration!" will play in memory. The reason is that they double functions, being officers that are very gentle, friendly, but also professional.

Customs in Niue is like any Customs from New Zealand or Australia. Just like the Immigration Officers, the Customs officers are also very professional. Still inside the plane, you'll have to fill up an "Enter Form" which consists of 3 sections with questions about your stay and what you are bringing in. What called my attention on this form, is that you have to sign 3 times, one for Immigration, another for Customs, and the last one I don't remember. Of course it could be much shorter with only one signature, but this is the way they do it.

Duty Free you can bring in : (for each person above 18)

  • 200 cigarettes or 227g of tobacco or 50 cigars

  • 3 bottles of spirits not exceeding 3 Litres.

What you can NOT bring in : 

  • Fire arm and ammunition

  • Illicit Drugs.

Note: There are no Duty free shops in Niue except a Bond Shop that sells a very limited variety of beers and wines, besides Customs in Alofi. They are located at the side-back of the commercial centre, next door to the customs. Note that you can buy duty free beers there until the next Wednesday after your arrival (4 days after your arrival). Just present your ticket, or passport, or simply tell your name to the person and he or she will look into your customs declaration which is filled there. A cartoon of beer which cost NZ$ 42, will ber NZ$ 36 duty free.

What you can NOT take out : 

  • Corals are prohibited by International conventions. Besides that, it is much better to leave the environment the way it is by not collecting anything dead or alive as a souvenir. Future generations will thank you for that.

Note about other countries customs: In Niue we received as a gift, a basket and a couple of necklaces made out of small yellow snail shells and a round small ball made from a kind of seed. In New Zealand we had no problems entering with these, but in Australia we did. Because we could not tell the names (popular and scientific) of the shells and seeds, they were confiscated by the quarantine officials. Regarding the straw basket, when the officer banged it against a white table, hundreds of small bugs (seems like chicken's flea) came out out the basket. Because it had a sentimental value for us, we had to pay A$ 30 for fumigation instead of having it also confiscated. In other words, if you're bring home baskets or straw souvenirs wash them very well before boarding the plane, making sure no monsters will come out right in front of the officer. It is a good idea also to get the names of the seed and shells in the necklaces. 

 

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